Welcome!

Thank you for taking the time to visit our website. We are a very active Pack with at least one activity per month aside from weekly meetings. There are currently 20 boys in our Pack and we are always looking for more. All of our Den Leaders have sons of their own in our Pack.

These are some of the fun activities that our Pack has participated in:

• Overnight Camping - After all, isn't that one of the most beloved parts of Scouting?
• Day Camp and Twilight Camp (pictures coming soon)
• Akron Zoo Overnight
• Cleveland Zoo Overnight (pictures coming soon)
• MAPS Air Museum (pictures coming soon)
• Massillon Tiger Football Game and Tailgating
• Parades
• Ramseyer Farms Pumpkin Patch visit and Bonfire
• Nature Hikes (pictures coming soon)
• and MANY MORE!

To help defray the costs of our activites, we have several fundraisers throughout the year. In the past, we have participated in the following fundraisers:

• Annual Boy Scouts of America Popcorn Sale
• Pepperoni Roll Sale
• Flower and Plant Sale
• Car Wash and Bake Sale

If you are interested in joining our pack or if you have any questions, please contact our Cubmaster, Mike or any of our other Leaders.

Thank you for visiting!

Mike Ott

Cubmaster
Pack 257
Massillon, OH



Scout Oath


On my honor, I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my country

and to obey the Scout Law;

To help other people at all times;

To keep myself physically strong,

mentally awake and morally straight.

Why Scouting?

For over 100 years, Scouting programs have instilled in youth the values found in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Today, these values are just as relevant in helping youth grow to their full potential as they were in 1910. Scouting helps youth develop academic skills, self-confidence, ethics, leadership skills, and citizenship skills that influence their adult lives.

The Boy Scouts of America provides youth with programs and activities that allow them to

• Try new things.
• Provide service to others.
• Build self-confidence.
• Reinforce ethical standards.

While various activities and youth groups teach basic skills and promote teamwork, Scouting goes beyond that and encourages youth to achieve a deeper appreciation for service to others in their community.

Scouting provides youth with a sense that they are important as individuals. It is communicated to them that those in the Scouting family care about what happens to them, regardless of whether a game is won or lost.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, Scouting promotes activities that lead to personal responsibility and high self-esteem. As a result, when hard decisions have to be made, peer pressure can be resisted and the right choices can be made.

Lifelong Learning

People need to learn all through their lives. We live in a society that rewards continual acquisition of skills and knowledge. Scouting provides structured settings where young people can learn new skills and develop habits of continual learning that will help them succeed. From its foundation, Scouting has offered a concrete program of discovering, sharing, and applying knowledge and skills.

Serving Others

Young people need to serve. The level of community service is a good indication of the health of any society. Scouting has, from its inception, been deeply rooted in the concept of doing for others. “Do a Good Turn Daily” is a core Scouting precept. Scouting encourages young people to recognize the needs of others and take action accordingly. Scouting works through neighborhoods, volunteer organizations, and faith-based organizations to help young people appreciate and respond to the needs of others.

Healthy Living

Young people need to be well. To get the most from life, one must be both mentally and physically fit. A commitment to physical wellness has been reflected in Scouting’s outdoor programs such as hiking, camping, swimming, climbing, and conservation. First aid, lifesaving, and safety programs are synonymous with Scouting. Our programs today include strong drug abuse awareness and prevention programs emphasizing the value of healthy living habits.

Building Character

Young people need to know to be good and to do good. Few will argue with the importance of teaching values and responsibility to our children – not only right from wrong, but specific, affirmative values such as fairness, courage, honor, and respect for others. Beginning with the Scout Oath and Scout Law, the Boy Scouts of America program is infused with character-building activities that allow youth to apply abstract principles to daily living situations.

Mentoring

Young people need mentors. Positive relationships with adults—community and religious leaders and, of course, parents—provide youth with good role models and have a powerful impact on their lives. Young people of every age can benefit from constructive, one-on-one interaction with adults beyond their own families. Scouting provides such adult interaction. We have a process that screens, selects, and trains the leaders who can provide that extra attention all young people need to succeed in life.

Scout Law


A Scout is Trustworthy
A Scout tells the truth. He keeps his promises. Honesty is part of his code of conduct. People can depend on him.

A Scout is Loyal
A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.

A Scout is Helpful
A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.

A Scout is Friendly
A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.

A Scout is Courteous
A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together.

A Scout is Kind
A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle. He treats others as he wants to be treated. He does not hurt or kill harmless things without reason.

A Scout is Obedient
A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them.

A Scout is Cheerful
A Scout looks for the bright side of things. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.

A Scout is Thrifty
A Scout works to pay his way and to help others. He saves for unforeseen needs. He protects and conserves natural resources. He carefully uses time and property.

A Scout is Brave
A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at or threaten him.

A Scout is Clean
A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean. He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals. He helps keep his home and community clean.

A Scout is Reverent
A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others.